BOSSY Events

We host monthly events that focus on various aspects of self-improvement and wellness, business ownership, leadership, and creativity. Most of our events are free to anyone who’d like to attend, but occasionally, we run paid events featuring field experts and valuable resources to help you improve yourself, and grow (or start!) your business.

Keep in the “know” about Rochester women-owned businesses and stay updated on upcoming events streaming from our Facebook page or Instagram.

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1 day ago

Bossy Rochester

Reposted from @newrootscoffeehouse Your favorite coffee is better with chocolate! Enjoy here or on the go! ... See MoreSee Less

Reposted from @newrootscoffeehouse Your favorite coffee is better with chocolate! Enjoy here or on the go!

1 day ago

Bossy Rochester

Reposted from @spectrumartsllc When it comes to the creative arts, many of us are taught that there is a "right" way to learn.

A "right" way to learn how to read music.
A "right" way to play an instrument.
A "right" way to hold a paint brush.

Unfortunately, this emphasis on a "right" way of doing things excludes a huge number of individuals who have enormous potential but desperately need a learning environment that can respond to their individual and unique accessibility needs.

Our goal at Spectrum is to constantly think of innovative strategies for increasing accessibility in the arts, putting our students at the very forefront of that process. It's not easy - sometimes it means we need to throw the lesson plan, method book, or our own beliefs around the learning process out the window.

But when we do this kind of work with our students, we are constantly amazed at what can be achieved.
... See MoreSee Less

Reposted from @spectrumartsllc When it comes to the creative arts, many of us are taught that there is a right way to learn. 

A right way to learn how to read music. 
A right way to play an instrument. 
A right way to hold a paint brush. 

Unfortunately, this emphasis on a right way of doing things excludes a huge number of individuals who have enormous potential but desperately need a learning environment that can respond to their individual and unique accessibility needs. 

Our goal at Spectrum is to constantly think of innovative strategies for increasing accessibility in the arts, putting our students at the very forefront of that process. Its not easy - sometimes it means we need to throw the lesson plan, method book, or our own beliefs around the learning process out the window. 

But when we do this kind of work with our students, we are constantly amazed at what can be achieved.

2 days ago

Bossy Rochester

Reposted from @the.house.of.roushey Fannie Lou Hamer was born in 1917 in Montgomery County, Mississippi. She was the youngest of 20 children and as early as 6 years old, was expected to help her family, who worked as sharecroppers on a plantation.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Fast forward to 1962 when Fannie Lou Hamer got involved in politics. Her passion was civil rights, specifically voter rights which came from first-hand experience with the registration process. She learned of her right to vote and traveled to a nearby town to register. The process, designed to suppress the vote of African Americans, was difficult to pass. When she returned home, her boss insisted that she withdraw her registration and fired her when she refused.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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From this point on, she experienced threats and attacks on her life by white supremacists. At one point, she was forced to leave her family and stay with a friend in another town in order to stay safe. And still, she continued to pursue her right to vote, taking the literacy test 3x's until she passed.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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As soon as she would overcome one hurdle, she realized that the county had imposed other laws to suppress her vote. And yet, she continued to persist.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
"In 1964, Hamer helped co-found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), in an effort to prevent the regional all-white Democratic party's attempts to stifle African-American voices, and to ensure there was a party for all people that did not stand for any form of exploitation and discrimination (especially towards minorities)."⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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As I read about Fannie Lou Hamer's fight for her right to vote, I was amazed at the parallel's within our current system. Our freedom is linked, whether it directly impacts us or not. Thank you Fannie Lou Hamer for your legacy of persistence and resistance. (excerpt from Wikipedia)
... See MoreSee Less

Reposted from @the.house.of.roushey Fannie Lou Hamer was born in 1917 in Montgomery County, Mississippi. She was the youngest of 20 children and as early as 6 years old, was expected to help her family, who worked as sharecroppers on a plantation.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Fast forward to 1962 when Fannie Lou Hamer got involved in politics. Her passion was civil rights, specifically voter rights which came from first-hand experience with the registration process. She learned of her right to vote and traveled to a nearby town to register. The process, designed to suppress the vote of African Americans, was difficult to pass. When she returned home, her boss insisted that she withdraw her registration and fired her when she refused.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
From this point on, she experienced threats and attacks on her life by white supremacists. At one point, she was forced to leave her family and stay with a friend in another town in order to stay safe. And still, she continued to pursue her right to vote, taking the literacy test 3xs until she passed.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
As soon as she would overcome one hurdle, she realized that the county had imposed other laws to suppress her vote. And yet, she continued to persist.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
In 1964, Hamer helped co-found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), in an effort to prevent the regional all-white Democratic partys attempts to stifle African-American voices, and to ensure there was a party for all people that did not stand for any form of exploitation and discrimination (especially towards minorities).⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
As I read about Fannie Lou Hamers fight for her right to vote, I was amazed at the parallels within our current system. Our freedom is linked, whether it directly impacts us or not. Thank you Fannie Lou Hamer for your legacy of persistence and resistance. (excerpt from Wikipedia)
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